For You

The Latest: Protesters gather near Trump's…

Several hundred people gather in Palm Beach, Florida, carrying anti-Donald Trump signs as they prepare to march near the president's Mar-a-Lago home

Electricians Find Victorian-Era Cigarettes and…

A royal discovery unearthed at Buckingham Palace dating back to the late 1800s. Buzz60's Nick Cardona (@nickcardona93) has that story.

YouTube's Cracking Down On The Latest Viral Video…

Social media companies are trying to stop kids from eating Tide Pods.

Facebook Is Going To Let Users Choose What News…

Facebook will ask users what news outlets they trust and use responses to prioritize publishers in News Feed.

AdChoices Icon

Dior travels back in time for couture-infused…

Designer Kris Van Assche traveled back in a fashion time machine on the fourth day of the fall-winter shows in Paris

AP-Scorecard

CDC: Flu Has Now Killed 30 Kids

The CDC's most recent report on the flu includes a grim stat that's climbing: As of the week ending Jan. 13, there have been 30 flu-associated pediatric deaths; that's up 10 from the week prior. A graphic shows that's still a much lower count than in the three previous years—...

The Latest: Argentina-born Francis sees Peru's…

Pope Francis may not have returned to his native Argentina since becoming pontiff, but he is traveling through a Peruvian town with the same name as his birthplace: Buenos Aires

How robotic exoskeletons could save disabled…

It was bleak medical diagnosis for his young nephew that put the idea in Manmeet Maggu’s head to launch a startup focused on robotic exoskeletons for children. A few years ago, Maggu and Trexo Robotics co-founder Rahul Udasi were still undergraduates at the University of Waterloo. That’s when they found out Maggu’s nephew had been diagnosed with cerebral palsy - and that he might never be able to walk as a result. Building robots was already something of an interest they shared. The diagnosis caused them to look around at the robotics market and decide - they ought to build something to help Maggu’s nephew. “When we started looking around, we realized the tremendous negative health effects of being in a wheelchair, especially for a child that’s going to spend their entire life in the wheelchair,” Maggu told BGR. “For us it was something - we started looking for ways to get (his nephew) out of the wheelchair, and pretty soon we realized today there’s no solution out there. There’s no exoskeleton or robotic solution that can help a child get out of the wheelchair and be walking around. That was when we decided to us our robotic experience and background to really build something for him.” It started off as a project, a kind of side hustle, before getting formalized into what would become Trexo, a Toronto-based startup. The company was launched in 2016, and it’s been moving forward incrementally since then. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJSlxFPd1F0 Maggu has been handing business development as the CEO, while Udasi is more on the product development/CTO side. Working in tandem to bring a product to life that excites physicians, therapists and parents. The company completed its first testable prototype in 2016. They also took it to India, to introduce it to Maggu’s nephew for a tryout. “We essentially watched him take some of his first steps using our device. That was an incredibly proud moment for us.” Since then, Trexo has been chosen as a finalist in the New Startup category in the upcoming Canadian Innovation Awards. At the end of 2017, the startup won first prize in a pitch competition led by a Toronto hospital’s philanthropic arm. And Trexo will be even busier this year. The startup is preparing to launch a pilot study with its device - which weighs about 30 pounds - with the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Trexo also is hoping to have secured U.S. approval for the device by the end of this year. Trexo’s device is essentially a converted walker. Two robotic legs attached to any walker are what allow the child to walk independently, using equipment they’re already familiar with. The response the team got from testing it out with Maggu’s nephew is what convinced them to keep going. “Then we started working on the next one and just after that - we started talking to more families, clinics and hospitals and realized the tremendous potential of this sort of device,” he said. “It’s families all over looking for a device like this. We started getting contacted by people in India, Canada, the U.S. - literally all over the globe. “Essentially, the way our device works is we take an existing walker - we decided to build around the walker. So we built robotic legs that attach onto the walker, and it provides powered assistance. So it’s basically powered motors on the hip joint as well as the knee joint that kind of provide the assistance in allowing a child to walk.” The entrepreneurs have participated in the Techstars Internet of Things accelerator, which helped get them even more ready to take the business farther. And it’s helped connect them to partnerships like the Cincinnati hospital that could prove useful long-term. “For us right now, it’s about building the right partnerships,” Maggu said. “There’s been a few exoskeleton companies out there. Most have started off with the adult market. We see the children’s market as the right place to start. We believe the future of exoskeletons begins with children. This is where you can have the highest impact. And then grow with the children as they grow into adulthood.”

Amazon Deals: Score Big Discounts On Memory Cards

Shop for memory cards from top brands including SanDisk, Transcend, Samsung, Sony and more.

Russian networks pushing conservative meme…

Russia-linked Twitter networks are pushing a conservative meme related to the investigation of Russian election interference, researchers say

Virtual Reality Chat Room Stunned as Robot Has Seizure

It was business as usual in the virtual reality chat room until the robot had a seizure. The Verge reports the unnerving incident happened Wednesday on VRChat, where users in the forms of avatars can interact with each other. According to the Daily Dot , "Morty, Sonic, Knuckles, a dude in...

T-Mobile’s customer service is its biggest…

Since John Legere took control of T-Mobile in 2012, the carrier has orchestrated a remarkable turn-around. Through launching the Un-Carrier initiative, T-Mobile turned its scrappy underdog status into a marketing plug, and by adding the iPhone to its lineup and investing heavily in network infrastructure, the company's product is now on par with AT&T and Verizon. But the most under-appreciated aspect of the turn-around is T-Mobile's customer service. Things still aren't perfect by any means, but T-Mobile's focus on customer care has had a measurable impact, resulting today in the highest-ever score on JD Power's wireless customer service survey. T-Mobile and its prepaid subsidiary, MetroPCS, each scored the highest-ever total score in their respective categories. That's an impressive achivement; it's even more impressive when you consider that five years ago, T-Mobile lagged behind the competition and wasn't even in first place overall. “Our incredible customer care teams at T-Mobile and MetroPCS just made history with their customer obsession, and because we’re the Un-carrier, we won’t stop at just being the best in wireless,” said John Legere, president and CEO of T-Mobile. “We’re primed to go totally next level in 2018!” Since starting the Un-Carrier movement, T-Mobile has rebranded its customer care team as "T-Force," and put emphasis on non-traditional customer care options like live chat support and social media direct messaging. It's still not a perfect system -- T-Mobile's billing and control software still causes problems for the reps themselves, which leads to billing errors on occasion -- but on basic metrics like wait time and problem resolution, T-Mobile has really turned things around.

AdChoices Icon

Maine town manager leads segregation group, promotes whites

The town manager of a rural Maine community says he's the leader of a racial segregationist group, and he believes the United States would be better off if people of different races were to "voluntarily separate."

Mudslides take heavy toll on immigrants serving…

Recent mudslides in a star-studded California coastal town took a heavy toll on gardeners and housekeepers, with members of working immigrant families accounting for nearly a third of the deaths.

Teens Don't Mind Online-Only Relationships

Children are having online-only relationships without meeting in real life, and apparently they don’t mind! The New York Post Reports. Buzz60's Sam Berman has the full story.

Trump Administration Keeps Many National Parks…

Republicans took the brunt of criticism when parks and monuments closed during the 2013 shutdown.

Paul Bocuse, globe-trotting master of French…

Paul Bocuse, the master chef who defined French cuisine for more than half a century and put it on tables around the world, has died at 91.

IOC says North Korea to have 22 athletes in 5…

The IOC says 22 North Korean athletes will compete in the Pyeongchang Olympics next month after an agreement was struck with the Korean neighbors

US flu season gets worse, has 'lot more steam…

Nasty US flu season gets worse, has 'lot more steam' than expected

Queen Learns Where Crown Jewels Were Hidden in War

A BBC documentary that aired last weekend about Queen Elizabeth had all kinds of interesting royal nuggets, but one revelation in particular was news to the queen herself. The makers of The Coronation were able to tell Elizabeth where her father hid the most precious of the crown jewels during...

Gabon says major ivory trafficking ring…

Gabon says major ivory trafficking ring dismantled, 10 arrested in blow to elephant poaching

AdChoices Icon

Facebook to emphasize 'trustworthy' news via user…

Facebook wants to emphasize 'trustworthy' news stories based on user surveys

Lithuania probing bogus story after TV station is hacked

Lithuania has launched an investigation into a cyberattack against a news outlet that saw a fake news article targeting the defense minister

Mountains yes, Ellis Island no: Some US parks…

The snowy mountains and frozen lakes of Rocky Mountain National Park are still accessible to visitors, despite the federal government shutdown